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Re: Dominic Lawson

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 Post subject: Re: Dominic Lawson
PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2017 2:43 pm 
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Yes, and their reaction to the election - "Bloody kids, what do they know, how dare they vote!" was rather telling too.

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 Post subject: Re: Dominic Lawson
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:16 am 
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Some pretty desperate stuff from Lawson. It comes across as one of the 'pleading' propaganda pieces, similar to Sun editorials. "Please believe us. It's all fine. Don't listen to anyone else, I beg you."




Mrs May is more popular than Corbyn, most had never heard of Patel or Fallon and it's Europe's governments that are in crisis: DOMINIC LAWSON offers some REAL news for the drama queens...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-5076041/DOMINIC-LAWSON-offers-REAL-news-drama-queens.html


Quote:
Among the more admirable characteristics of the British people is a refusal to panic. Phlegmatic might be the word that best describes us.

Would that that were true of the parliamentary Conservative Party, which, if countless reports in the Press and in the broadcasting media are even halfway correct, is undergoing a self-generated nervous breakdown.

Their constant text is: Theresa May doesn’t know what she’s doing on Brexit, the EU is triumphant and our Government is collapsing.

This theme has been enthusiastically taken up by newspapers on the Continent and by EU politicians charged with negotiating the terms of Britain’s exit from the institutions of Brussels.

The headline on the front page of last Thursday’s Times was: ‘Brussels braced for fall of Theresa May’s government.’ This seemed largely based on the fact that in the previous fortnight, two Cabinet ministers — Michael Fallon and Priti Patel — had resigned.

Here’s some real news for the drama queens of Westminster and Brussels.

Outside the circles of the politically obsessed, no one cares or even knows much about Michael Fallon and Priti Patel: still less about whatever precipitated their exit from the Cabinet.

Security

For the record, Fallon left because he had made lewd remarks to female colleagues sometime in the past, and Patel because when on ‘holiday’ in Israel she had held discussions with Israeli politicians without telling the Foreign Office.

Is there anyone — anyone normal, that is — who thinks this means the Government is done for? Who believes, either, that what Fallon and Patel did is unforgivably damaging to voters, or that they are such towering figures as to be irreplaceable?

I repeat: no one outside the self-inflating Westminster bubble could possibly believe either proposition.

And to the extent that the Fallon resignation was connected to the similarly over-puffed issue of unwanted slap and tickle in the corridors of Parliament (‘Pestminster’): who really thinks that this storm in a Westminster teacup has the slightest effect on the well-being and security of the British people?

This didn’t stop the BBC running as its main story on the 10 o’clock news last Thursday, a report from Brussels breathlessly declaring that European leaders viewed what was happening to the British Government ‘with incredulity’.

We were told they couldn’t believe the level of chaotic dysfunctionality in the May administration.

I don’t think that our negotiating partners in the EU can teach us much about political stability.

The Germans are still, months after their general election, struggling to establish a workable governing coalition (it will have to involve three parties, which is a mess). And after that election, the Bundestag has, for the first time, a significant body of MPs — in the shape of Alternative für Deutschland — some of whom are close to neo-Nazi, and all of whom want to disrupt the cosy pro-EU consensus in Berlin.

Spain is facing the biggest constitutional crisis since it returned to democracy, with the threatened secession of its most economically vibrant region, Catalonia. Meanwhile, across the Pyrenees, Emmanuel Macron’s poll ratings have fallen with a speed and depth never before witnessed in a recently elected French President.

By contrast, Theresa May’s post-election standing in the polls (and that of her party) has remained unaffected by all the alleged chaos in her Cabinet or in the Brexit negotiations: proof, if it were needed, that the public can tell a real crisis from a phoney one generated by backbenchers angry at lack of promotion or by media sound and fury signifying nothing.

Thus a YouGov survey last week showed that support for Mrs May as the public’s preferred choice as PM rose by one point over the month to 34 per cent.

The proportion of those saying they’d prefer Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn as PM had fallen by two points to 31 per cent. Meanwhile, the parties themselves were running neck-and-neck, with Labour leading the Conservatives by 43 per cent to 40 per cent.

The former PM Tony Blair observed of this, in his characteristic chat-show tone: ‘Come on guys, we should be 15, 20 points ahead at this stage.’ And that great election-winner for Labour had the right to make this point.

Exhausted

When John Major was facing internal challenges to his own leadership of the Conservative Party in the mid-1990s, the party was more than 40 per cent behind Labour in the polls.

And towards the end of Gordon Brown’s period of office, his own polling ratings were so far behind the then Opposition leader David Cameron’s that, if it were a boxing match, the referee would have stopped the bout. Indeed, Brown had looked every inch a beaten man, a grey and exhausted shadow.

The same description might also have been levelled at Major as his government became ever more embattled: perhaps unfairly, both he and Brown were portrayed as men on the edge of complete nervous collapse.

As it happened, I met Theresa May last week and had a chat with her (not least about the glittering Remembrance poppy brooch she was wearing — it came from M&S, she assured me). Now, I’m no doctor, but she looked strong and well — far from someone crushed by adversity.

It’s true that she had a deep crisis of confidence in the immediate aftermath of June’s General Election, when, as much as anything because of her own awkwardness and leadenness as a campaigner, the Conservatives lost their parliamentary majority.

But, disastrous as that was, she is now coping dutifully with the consequences — and this commands more respect from her fellow leaders in the EU than you might imagine from the headlines.

And while those in this country who don’t accept the result of the 2016 referendum take a most unseemly delight in what they see as her and the UK’s weakness in our divorce negotiations with the EU, Mrs May has not been deflected from her original objectives (departure from membership of the Single Market and Customs Union, and from the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice).
Meanwhile, as Paul Goodman, the highly respected editor of the website Conservative Home, pointed out yesterday: ‘Our media is not set up to probe the differences and divisions among our negotiating partners, which are no less real for not being adequately covered.’

Buoyant

Obviously, if the economy were in the tank, then Mrs May and her administration really would be in the terminal trouble that so much of the media describe as fact (rather than their own lurid anticipation). And it would be if the claims of the Remain campaign had been vindicated: that a vote for Leave would in and of itself lead to an immediate surge in unemployment and a recession.

But their forecasts were no more than black propaganda.

Last week brought the latest batch of figures refuting those politically manipulated prophesies of doom.

In October, Britain’s industrial production grew for the sixth month in a row, the first time that has happened in almost a quarter of a century. And the Bank of England said that it expected average wages in the UK to increase by between 2.5 and 3.5 per cent next year.

If this is one of the Bank’s forecasts that actually becomes true, there really would be an improvement in the popular mood.

But the public’s attitude is in any case much more buoyant than that of the vast majority of pundits — and certainly of the anti-Brexit claque who believe their own propaganda that Britain can’t cope with life outside the EU.

Figures released last week by the Office for National Statistics show that ‘average happiness levels’ in the year to June 2017 rose to more than 7.5 (out of ten), the highest since this form of data was first collected in 2011.

I am not a great believer in ‘the happiness index’, but the fact that it has moved upwards over the past year does put the self-indulgent panic of Conservative MPs (and those who encourage them) into sharp perspective.

Of course, it’s good sport for the media to create a sense that the Government will collapse at any moment. But if that’s wrong, then it is not Theresa May, but they and the rent-a-quote disaffected politicians who will deserve to be treated with contempt.





Careful, whodareswins is onto us...


Quote:
whodareswins, manchester, United Kingdom, 6 hours ago
Most of us normal folks know what is going on, we see all these Scandals as just the polititical smoke screen it is to try and undermind the goverment with the bbc at the forfront of its bias to us leaving the EU, The only way the EU can get what it wants or for the referendum stoped is to oust may cause another election and try and get labour in as they will roll over for anything the EU wants. And in the EU media its good for them to say that our goverment looks weak ect it takes away the attention of whats going on all over the EU and are not reporting hardly any of it.because the EU knows its in trouble and dont know how to stop whats happening and they keep making things worst with saying that they want more intergration and more EU ha ha
+299 -18




Quote:
mayday80, Vaud, Switzerland, 2 hours ago
ABSOLUTELY CORRECT. WE ARE MADE OF A STRONG BACK BONE AS WAS ABUNDANTLY CLEAR IN REMEMBRANCE DAY CELEBRATIONS AND WE WILL NOT BE KOWTOWING TO ANY LITTLE JUNKET BUNCH. WE VOTED OUT. AND WE WILL BE OUT NO MATTER HOW MANY JOURNALISTS CHOSE TO WRITE THEIR LIES.
+100 -7





May is a lion:

Quote:
James Bondi, England, United Kingdom, 2 hours ago
Compared to Cameron who waltzed off the minute things got tricky, May is a lion. She has survived everything the propaganda machine has thrown at her.
+96 -8


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 Post subject: Re: Dominic Lawson
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:38 am 
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whodareswins. Tells you all you need to know, really.

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 Post subject: Re: Dominic Lawson
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:45 am 
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Lawson has made some points worth discussing which Labour have in the light of Blair's question as to why Labour aren't 15 points ahead and the worse government still polling over 40 per cent?

We're in different times and you won't see mid-term opposition spikes but the even-stevens polls are reflecting real voting patterns. The Tory baseline is about 30 percent and the other 10 percent contain a lot of nativist BlueKIP voters who hate Blair or Clegg as much as Corbyn. They are not going to shift unless Frank Field became Labour leader. I also think Labour is still benefitting from centrists and Remainers lending their vote to Corbyn but real enthusiasm.

A more interesting question is why the LDs, Plaid and SNP aren't polling better.


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 Post subject: Re: Dominic Lawson
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 12:08 pm 
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The Red Arrow wrote:
whodareswins. Tells you all you need to know, really.


Quote:
Most of us normal folks.....


Oh yeah. Everything.

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 Post subject: Re: Dominic Lawson
PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 12:16 pm 
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Quote:
James Bondi, England, United Kingdom, 2 hours ago
Compared to Cameron who waltzed off the minute things got tricky, May is a lion. She has survived everything the propaganda machine has thrown at her.


He is referring to lionfish on Blueplanet last night that were grabbed by what appeared to be bottom feeder sock puppets? It also featured clownfish who eerily looked like Boris Johnson.


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